Terrence Gardner

Terrence Gardner Assistant Professor Soil and Environmental Microbial Ecology

Terrence Gardner
Assistant Professor
Soil and Environmental
Microbial Ecology

Assistant Professor
Soil and Environmental Microbial Ecology

3411C Williams Hall
Campus Box 7620
Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7620
North Carolina State University

Office Phone: 919.515.7000
Email: Terrence_Gardner@ncsu.edu

Specialty Soil and Environmental Microbial Ecology
Current research focuses on improving our understanding of the linkages between microbial community and diversity, and microbially mediated processes providing ecosystem services related to metabolic functioning, in agronomic and environmental systems. In our research, we integrate multiple technologies to discern any connections among diverse microbial communities, their metabolic functions and the land systems they reside. The technologies include but are not limited to, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), molecular biology, Metagenomic, and bioinformatics tools. These tools provide the ability to elucidate microbial patterns of community structure and distribution involving their contributions to nutrient cycling and the transformations of pollutants in soils, sediments and water.

 

Recent Publications

  • Acosta-Martinez, V., Cotton, J., Gardner, T.G., Moore-Kucera, J., Zak, J., Wester, D., Cox, S. (2014). Predominant bacterial and fungal assemblages in agricultural soils during a record drought/heat wave and linkages to enzyme activities of biogeochemical cycling. Applied Soil Ecology. 84:69-82.
  • Acosta-Martinez, V., Moore-Kucera, J., Cotton, J., Gardner, T.G., Wester, D. (2014). Soil enzyme activities during the 2011 Texas record drought/heat wave and implications to biogeochemical cycling and organic matter dynamics. Applied Soil Ecology. 75:43-51.
  • Padilla, J., Calderon, F., Acosta-Martinez, V., Van Pelt, S., Gardner, T.G., Mathew Baddock, Zobeck, T.M., Noveron, J. (2014). Diffuse-reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy reveals chemical differences in soil organic matter carried in different size wind eroded sediments. Aeolian Research. In Press, Corrected Proof
  • Harrington, J.M., Gardner, T.G., Amoozegar, A., Andrews, M.Y., Rivera, N.A., and Duckworth, O.W. (2013). A workshop to facilitate the development of learning modules for 6-12 grade science classes based on biogeochemical research. Natural Sciences Education. 42:75-84
  • Gardner, T. G., V. Acosta-Martinez, T. M. Zobeck, M. Baddock, R. S. Van Pelt, Z. Senwo, S. Dowd and S. Cox. (2011). Pyrosequencing Reveal Distinct Bacteria in Different Wind Eroded Sediments from the Same Source Soil. J. Environ. Qual. 41:744-753.
  • Gardner, T. G., Acosta-Martinez, V., Senwo, Z., and Dowd, S. E. (2011). Soil Rhizosphere Microbial Communities and Enzyme Activities under Organic Farming in Alabama. Diversity 3:308-328.